Invited tracks

Current Advances in Drug Delivery Systems
Code: 8gf11

  • Organizers:

    • Prof. Dr. Horacio Cabral, The University of Tokyo, Department of Bioengineering
    • Prof. Dr. Frederico Pittella, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences
  • Abstract:

    Drug Delivery Systems have emerged as an effective tool for the treatment of various disease conditions. These systems refer to the technology used to modulate and optimize the delivery of medicines towards a therapeutic effect by decreasing or avoiding degradation, inefficient absorption, immunogenic and drug toxicity adverse effects. Thus, the approaches include efficient drug delivery strategies to reach the exact location in the body at optimal concentrations by passive and active targeting, the release based on physiological differences between healthy and diseased tissue and the recognition of targets from a specific site at the affected tissue. In addition to targeted delivery the drugs, its route of administration and drug formulations are also important challenges both for pharmacological and diagnostic purposes. Therefore, drug delivery systems for carrying medicines to specific sites of the body are dynamic and broad field, which allows advancements towards better treatment and prognosis. Still, there is plenty a room for development down to the nanoscale, based on theoretical rationale and experimental proof. In addition, a broad range of biomaterials are able to be applied to the construction of nanodevices for drug release, and it includes polymers, lipids, inorganic salts, among others. Finally, this session is of great relevance for the BMS community and aims to bring together researchers working on Drug Delivery Systems of distinct nature, to discuss the path from bench to clinical applications.

Additive Manufacturing Applied to Medicine
Code: nfyig

  • Organizers:

    • Prof. Dr. Ahmad Barari, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Canada
    • Dr. Chi-Nan Pai, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil
    • Dr. Emilio Carlos Nelli Silva, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil
  • Abstract:

    This session is focused on the medical applications of additive manufacturing
    technologies. This new technology allows the production of objects with almost any shape
    or geometry, which is particularly interesting in the medical field, due to the irregular
    geometry of the human body. Therefore, researches for this new technology with
    applications in the medical field, which involve novel design methods, manufacturing
    processes, and suitable organic or inorganic material, are fast growing worldwide. Authors
    are invited to submit papers that cover: Prosthetics; Orthopedic Implants; Dental, bone or
    tissue scaffolds; bioresorbable materials; bioprinting and others.

Medical Imaging
Code: 9jjfe

  • Organizers:

    • Prof. Dr. Baláz Benyó, Hungary
    • Prof. Dr. Fábio Menocci Cappabianco, Brazil
    • Prof. Dr. Marcos de Sales Guerra Tsuzuki, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil
    • Prof. Dr. Paulo Vechiatto de Miranda, Brazil
    • Prof. Dr. Paulo Vechiatto de MirProf. Dr. Yen-Wei Chen, Japan
  • Abstract:

    This session focuses on all aspects of the processing and analysis of medical
    imaging. Authors are invited to submit papers which covers – Medical Imaging and
    Diagnosis, Image Processing Methods, Image Fusion Methods, Feature Recognition and
    Extraction Methods, Biomechanical Imaging, Image Archiving and Communication,
    Telemedicine and Virtual Environments, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Functional
    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Fmri), Single-photon Emission Computed Tomography
    (SPECT), Positron Emission Tomography (PET), High Resolution Research Tomography
    (HRRT), Magnetoencephalography (MEG), Ultrasound and Optical Imaging, Optical
    Elastography, X-ray Microscopy, Biophotonics, Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer
    (FRET), Conventional Microscopy, Confocal Microscopy, Fluorescent Microscopy,
    Quantitative Bioimaging, Structural Biology, Brain Function Analysis, Hemodynamics
    Imaging, Histology and Tissue Imaging.

Bio-Impedance and Electrical Impedance Tomography
Code: x2dfe

  • Organizers:

    • Prof. Dr. Knut Moeller, Institute of Technical Medicine, Germany
    • Prof. Dr. Marcos de Sales Guerra Tsuzuki, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil
    • Prof. Dr. Raul Gonzalez Lima, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil
    • Prof. Dr. Thiago de Castro Martins, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil
  • Abstract:

    Electrical impedance tomography and bio-impedance continue to provide new
    challenges. They are fast, inexpensive, portable, and sensitive to physiological changes
    which affect electrical impedance properties. Electrical impedance tomography has several
    applications: lung ventilation, impedance cardiology, gastric emptying, brain function
    imaging and perfusion imaging. Authors are invited to submit full papers describing original
    research work associated with a wide variety of topics: bio-impedance application, bio-
    impedance instrumentation, electrical impedance tomography, electrode modeling,
    magnetic induction, nonlinear phenomena, organ and tissue impedance, clinical
    applications, hardware and impedance imaging, software for impedance imaging,
    algorithms and data analysis, inverse problems and theory.

Clinical Validation and Implementation
Code: rg5ta

  • Organizers:

    • Prof. Dr. Geoffrey Chase, New Zealand
    • Prof. Dr. Baláz Benyó, Hungary
    • Dr. Thomas Deasaive, Belgium
    • Prof. Dr. Knut Mueller, Germany
    • Dra. Jennifer Dickson, New Zealand
  • Abstract:

    Electrical impedance tomography and bio-impedance continue to provide new
    challenges. They are fast, inexpensive, portable, and sensitive to physiological changes
    which affect electrical impedance properties. Electrical impedance tomography has several
    applications: lung ventilation, impedance cardiology, gastric emptying, brain function
    imaging and perfusion imaging. Authors are invited to submit full papers describing original
    research work associated with a wide variety of topics: bio-impedance application, bio-
    impedance instrumentation, electrical impedance tomography, electrode modeling,
    magnetic induction, nonlinear phenomena, organ and tissue impedance, clinical
    applications, hardware and impedance imaging, software for impedance imaging,
    algorithms and data analysis, inverse problems and theory.

Fractional Order Control in Biomedicine
Code: 56chn

  • Organizers:

    • Prof. Dr. Dana Copot, Belgium
    • Prof. Dr. Hassan BosseinNia, Netherlands
  • Abstract:

    Fractional calculus is currently gaining increasingly popularity in the control
    engineering community. The origin of this emerging concept dates to the early days of
    classical differential calculus, although its inherent complexity postponed its use and
    application to the engineering world. Nowadays, its use in control engineering has been
    gaining increasingly momentum in both modeling and identification, as well as in the
    controller tuning.

    The aim of this Invited Track is to promote further the development of fractional
    order calculus in the field of control engineering for biomedical applications. Authors
    considering this Invited Track are welcome to submit research papers focusing on the use
    of this methodology in the field of biomedical engineering. This session has relevance for
    the BMS community and its purpose is to resent the newest and novel developments and
    achievements in several branches of biomedicine, (e.g. anesthesia control, nanorobot
    control, etc.).

Identification and Personalized Care
Code: 9312g

  • Organizers:

    • Prof. Dr. Geoffrey Chase, New Zealand
    • Prof. Dr. Baláz Benyó, Hungary
    • Prof. Dr. Knut Mueller, Germany
    • Dr. Paul Docherty, New Zealand
  • Abstract:

    These 1 to 2 session proposals focus on all aspects of identification methods and
    associated models, including identifiability analysis, with a focus on the use of identified
    model parameters in clinical applications. The session imagines a group of 6 (1 session)
    or 12 (2 sessions) papers covering identification methods and outcomes/impact on clinical
    applications of models. Thus, the papers might cover any or all of:

    1. Identifiability methods focusing on identifying key clinical parameters.
    2. Identifiability analysis of models and methods with respect to available.
      clinical data for a given clinical application.
    3. Method validation in clinical use or testing with clinical data.

    All papers would reasonably be expected to use clinical or similar measured data
    to reinforce these aspects, or make use of existing data in justifying their methods and
    analysis with respect to a specific clinical application area (or areas). Papers will be from
    all areas of care and all organ groups and/or physiological systems.

Modeling and Clinical Applications
Code: 2dh39

  • Organizers:

    • Prof. Dr. Geoffrey Chase, New Zealand
    • Prof. Dr. Baláz Benyó, Hungary
    • Dr. Thomas Deasaive, Belgium
    • Prof. Dr. Knut Mueller, Germany
    • Dr. Chris Pretty, New Zealand
  • Abstract:

    These 1 to 2 session proposals focus on all aspects of modeling for clinical
    applications. The session imagines a group of 6 (1 session) or 12 (2 sessions) papers
    covering models specifically designed for clinical use and application in care. Thus, the
    papers might cover any or all of:

    1. Model design and dynamics for clinical application – simplification, or design
      for identifiability, or how elements in the model represent the physiology and
      clinical workflow.
    2. Model design and identification with a goal of identifiability for use with
      available clinical data.
    3. The validation of models on available clinical data, including potentially pilot
      trials and their results with respect to where models succeeded or failed.

    All papers would be expected to use clinical or similar measured data to reinforce
    these aspects, or make use of existing data in justifying their modeling and design for the
    clinical application. Papers will be from all areas of care and all organ groups and/or
    physiological systems.

Biological and Artificial Motor Control: a return trip
Code: g99aw

  • Organizers:

    • Prof. Dr. Jaak Duysens, Belgium
    • Prof. Dr. Dr. Thiago de Castro Martins, Brazil
    • Dr. Arturo Forner Cordero, Brazil
  • Abstract:

    The bioinspiration in artificial motor control and robotics has suffered from the
    differences in the fields that have traditionally approached Biological Motor Control and
    Robotics. There are specific fields of robotics, such as legged walkers that has been deeply
    inspired by biology, e.g. the concept of Central Pattern Generators for bipedal,
    quadrupedal and hexapodal robots. However, there are new ideas in the field of biological
    motor control, such as the development of the internal models in the cerebellum that need
    to benefit from the interaction with the Artificial Motor Control community. In addition, it is
    important to note that Biology can inspire engineering design at several levels, related to
    the different levels of insight about the biological mechanisms, building on the distinction
    between biomimetism and bioinspiration.

    Bioinspiration, as defined by the ISO/TC266, is a design method based on the
    observation of biological systems. It does not need a complete understanding of the goals
    and mechanisms of the observed biological system. However, Biomimetics requires a deep
    understanding of the biological system because it involves is defined as the
    interdisciplinary the cooperation of biology and technology to solve a certain practical
    problem. Biomimetism uses analysis and modelling models of biological systems in order,
    to transfer these models to applicable appropriate solutions. It requires a deep
    understanding of the biological system.

Clinical Potential of Modeling and Non-invasive Imaging in Pulmonary Care
Code: m61p7

  • Organizers:

    • Prof. Dr. Geoffrey Chase, New Zealand
    • Prof. Dr. Knut Mueller, Germany
    • Prof. Dr. Raul Gonzalez Lima, Brazil
    • Prof. Dr. Marcelo Amato, Brazil
  • Abstract:

    This session would focus the advances made in pulmonary modeling to guide
    care, including developments of predictive virtual patient models and methods, as well as
    (separately) on the necessary improvements required to make best use of such emerging
    models. In particular, pulmonary care lacks sensors to provide insight into internal lung
    mechanics and recruitment, in every form of the disease. Thus, the second arm of this
    session (or a second session) will focus on non-invasive and/or model-based imaging
    methods for pulmonary mechanics, such as (but not limited to) electro-impedance
    tomography. The two arms of this session thus focus on the need to develop predictive
    models and better physiological data / sensors, in order to create the same virtuous cycle
    of model-based management and potential automation seen in glycemic control and
    rehabilitation (for two examples). Finally, the session (or each session) will include a
    clinical speaker to focus on the clinical aspects and needs. Thus, the session(s) combine
    engineering and medicine with a common goal, better models and imaging/sensing to
    provide better, potentially automated care.

Pulsatile Pressure and Flow in Hemodynamics: Measurement, Clinical Application, Surgical Techniques, and Modeling
Code: x9s96

  • Organizers:

    • Prof. Dr. Jayme Pinto Ortiz, Brazil
    • Profa. Dra. Luciana Venturini Rossoni, Brazil
    • Prof. Dr. Ajit Yoganathan, United States of America
  • Abstract:

    Theoretical, experimental and clinical principles applied to blood flow in arteries
    continue to have a strong interest in basic and applied researches. Arterial pulsations
    resulting from ventricular ejection related with pulsatile pressure and flow are in the
    center of this interest. Although the ability for measurement and interpretation of
    pressure and flow in humans depends on an understanding of physiological principles,
    which were stablished a long time ago, the interest in this subject remains strong,
    influenced by the application of new technologies in medicine, including instrumentations,
    surgery techniques and blood flow experimental and numerical models. One example to
    be emphasized is the flow patterns of a prosthetic heart valves, including new materials
    application, benefit-cost analysis, technology development, simulation, measurement and
    surgery techniques. Another example is the improvement in the use of stents and
    endoprosthesis, including also technology development, simulation, measurement and
    surgery techniques. Authors are invited to submit full papers describing original research
    work associated with a wide variety of topics: properties of arterial walls, pulsatile
    pressure-flow relations, atherosclerosis, wave reflections and pulse velocities, cardiac
    valves: metallic, biological and new materials application, stents and endoprosthesis,
    pulmonary circulation, lifestyle and environmental impacts.